Our Mission

The Family Effect works to reduce addiction as a leading cause of family collapse and harm to children in South Carolina. 

We believe that families are the fertile soil from which all good things grow.  But what is happening to our families in the Upstate?  In a typical year for Greenville County:

5,000 children can't live with their parents

2,420 domestic assaults are reported

1,326 children are confirmed as neglected or abused

559 children are removed from their home by the state

1,100 first graders are unprepared for a successful start in school

1,000 students drop out of high school, never to return

Photograph by Polly GaillardThe numbers can be overwhelming.  Many local nonprofits and government agencies are working very hard- and spending a combined $25 million in Greenville County every year - to glue these broken families back together. 

But what is making so many families come apart?
  Find just about any nonprofit program director working on the front lines, and ask them that question.  You will hear an overwhelmingly common answer-  addiction in the home is at the root of the problem.

Addiction is breaking our families apart from the inside out.

We all pay a heavy price for addiction in the home.  Greenville County taxpayers spend more than $500 million each year on the widespread collateral damage of addiction, including the staggering healthcare and law enforcement costs generated by the problem.  That translates to a $1,300 tax burden on every man, woman and child in Greenville County - every year.

The children suffer the most. 

Addiction in the home creates more abused and neglected kids, more unprepared first graders and more high school dropouts than any other single root cause. 

And the negative effects can be permanent for children.  When kids live in a household where addiction is present, they are 4 times more likely to become addicted themselves.

The Family Effect is working to change these dynamics at their root.

We raise money and recruit volunteers for effective, research-based programs at The Phoenix Center of Greenville that focus on children and families.

And there is good news...Greenville is home to some extraordinary programs that effectively reduce addiction’s impact in the family home.  When the bottleneck of addiction is removed for a family, good things start to happen on their own- with less government and nonprofit intervention, and much less public cost.

Please join us.

You can make a statement for the power of families by getting involved, and by investing in the transformation of our children and families

You can also connect with us and stay updated on our mission and work.  Come take a quick tour.   Join the mission as a volunteer.  Book a speaker for your group.  Every time you help us spread the word, you are working to prevent family collapse and harm to children.

The Family Effect is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, Federal ID # 57-1129751.  All contributions are tax-deductible as allowed by Federal law.

Board of Directors

Learn more about our Board of Directors, which includes Coach Dabo Swinney of the Clemson Tigers and many other renowned community leaders.

Staff

Meet the staff of The Family Effect.

Our Partners

We are very grateful for the commitment of our partners.  Like you, they believe in the power of strong families, and they invest in the futures of our community's children.


Annual statistics for children and families are drawn from the 2009 South Carolina Kids Count, Annie E. Casey Foundation, and the South Carolina Department of Social Services, Greenville Child Welfare Services Review, April 2008.

$ 25 million is spent annually through the combined annual budgets of Greenville DSS Foster Care & Adoption Subsidies, Pendleton Place Children's Shelter, A Child's Haven, Greenville Rape Crisis & Child Abuse Center, and Safe Harbor.

The figure of $ 500 million spent annually in Greenville County is drawn from the South Carolina State and County Needs Assessment, Tripp-Umbach Healthcare Consulting, 2002.

The statistic on the likelihood of childhood addiction is drawn from a report by the Prevention Research Institute, 2004.